Saturday, January 05, 2008

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Ed O'Loughlin

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Ed O'Loughlin is a journalist for John Fairfax Holdings, an Australian media group. His reporting appears in the Australian newspapers The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age.

O'Loughlin was born in Toronto, Canada in 1966 and studied liberal arts at the Trinity College, Dublin. His career as a freelance journalist began in Zaire (now the Democratic Republic of the Congo). In 1994 O'Loughlin began work for The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age, first in South Africa as an African correspondent, a position he held for eight years. Since 2002 he has been based in Jerusalem, covering news events in Israel and the Palestinian territories.

[edit] Praise and awards

[edit] Reception and criticism of reporting on Israel

A Wikipedian is concerned that this section gives undue weight to one side.
Please see the talk page. Help improve the article by adding more information and sources on points of view that may be neglected.


O'Loughlin's reporting has received criticism from media commentary groups [1] and the Australian Jewish and Lebanese [2] community groups who have accused him of unfair journalistic practices.

Australian MP Michael Danby is quoted as saying "There's nothing funny about O'Loughlin's systematic bias against Israel"[3]. Bret Stephens (former editor of the Jerusalem Post) in a 2004 editorial accused O'Loughlin of anti-Israeli bias in the Mordechai Vanunu case, claiming that O'Loughlin's coverage was "an open and shut case of bias" [4].

O'Loughlin has also received criticism in the Jewish Political Studies Review[5] and the Australian-based ICJS Research[6].

In 2003 a (now-defunct) organisation called Media Studies Group (a group that monitored anti-Israeli bias in the media) published an analysis of the The Age's reporting on the Israeli/Palestinian conflict, with particular reference to O'Loughlin. The authors identified 210 cases of perceived violations of various journalistic standards, and that O'Loughlin was responsible for 51% of these. [7]

On 19 December 2007, O'Loughlin was nominated for a "Dishonest Reporter" award and won an award[8] in the "Worst Moral Equivalence" category by Honest Reporting, a media monitoring group with approximately 140,000 subscribers.

[edit] References

  1. ^ West Bank and Gaza: Fairy Tales and the Media
  2. ^ UALM Calls for Factual Reporting
  3. ^ Higgins, Ean. "Fairfax's Israel coverage panned", The Australian, 2007-09-15. Retrieved on 2007-12-04.
  4. ^ Stephens, Bret. "The meaning of Vanunu", The Jerusalem Post, 2004-04-23. Retrieved on 2007-12-04.
  5. ^ Israel in the Australian Media by Fleischer Retrieved on: 2007 December 1
  6. ^ Comments on Ed O'Loughlin by Arnold Roth Retrieved on: 2007-12-04
  7. ^ Media Study Group's Study of Compliance with Journalistic Standards at The Age Retrieved on: 2007-12-01.
  8. ^ Honest Reporting Dishonest Reporter Award 2007

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5 comments:

Leon R. Distiller said...

This entire story should be sent directly to Honest Reporting and to the general news media. Wikipedia should be exposed for the way it protected this reporter.

Wilbur Post said...

As a matter of interest Eleland, on his own page on Wikipedia, states that he created the page on cluster bombs. The entry on cluster bombs refers to Israel's use of that weapon but ignores the fact that Hizbullah also used cluster bombs directly against civilian targets in Israel during the Second Lebanon War. It's anyone's guess as to what might happen if someone tried to edit the entry to incorporate this fact.

Anonymous said...

Indeed, I deliberately, and gleefully, omitted that information about the 2006 Lebanon war when I wrote the first version of that article. In 2002. That's just how long we've been planning it.

Wilbur Post said...

"Indeed, I deliberately, and gleefully, omitted that information about the 2006 Lebanon war when I wrote the first version of that article. In 2002. That's just how long we've been planning it."

Touchy, aren't we?

Are you denying that "the entry on cluster bombs refers to Israel's use of that weapon but ignores that Hizbullah also used cluster bombs directly against civilian targets in Israel during the Second Lebanon War."

If you are who you want us to think you are then why don't you correct the obvious error?

Anonymous said...

I am who you think I am, and I already did.